Feds stonewall on evidence U.S. terror attacks could have been prevented

By Art Moore

Victims of the Dec. 2, 2015, terror attack in San Bernardino, California

Victims of the Dec. 2, 2015, terror attack in San Bernardino, California

When Syed Farook and Tashfeen Malik massacred 14 people in San Bernardino, California in 2015, newly retired Department of Homeland Security Officer Philip Haney was horrified to discover that a major case he spent years developing might have helped prevent the attack had it not been shut down by a branch of his own agency and Hillary Clinton’s State Department.

Now, in his ongoing effort to help prevent future attacks by uncovering how the government quashed his case, three federal agencies either have flatly denied they have any communications or records related to the case, known as the Tablighi Jamaat Initiative, or refused to acknowledge whether or not the case ever existed.

Syed Farook with his wife, Tashfeen Malik, killed 14 people at a Christmas party in San Bernardino, California on Dec. 2, 2015.

Haney is seeking the information with the help of the Washington watchdog Judicial Watch, which has filed Freedom of Information Act requests with the State Department, the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and Customs and Border Protection, the division of DHS for which he worked.

Contrary to the federal government’s responses, Haney already has in his possession a document showing the Tablighi Jamaat case was officially authorized by the DHS chief counsel. And he has a 2012 commendation letter from the head of the CPB’s National Targeting Center along with a cache of DHS memos that not only verified the existence of the case but also confirmed it was shut down.

“I was astonished that my own agency would neither confirm or deny whether a case that was not only authorized by the DHS chief counsel but had also produced more than 1,200 law enforcement actions ever existed,” Haney told WND.

Judicial Watch previously Click to see the original article