Testing Reveals Floodwater In Houston Homes Contain Toxins

By Mac Slavo

flooding

Photo: Flooding in Rockport, Texas in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

Residents in Houston need to take precautions, as testing of the flood waters left by Hurricane Harvey came back showing bacteria and toxic matter abundant in the homes devastated by the storm.

It is not clear how far the toxic waters have spread but Fire Chief Samuel Peña of Houston said over the weekend that there had been breaches at numerous waste treatment plants. The Environmental Protection Agency said on Monday that 40 of 1,219 such plants in the area were not working. According to the New York Times, the results of testing have been worrisome.

Water flowing down Briarhills Parkway in the Houston Energy Corridor contained Escherichia coli, a measure of fecal contamination, at a level more than four times that considered safe. In the Clayton Homes public housing development downtown, along the Buffalo Bayou, scientists found what they considered astonishingly high levels of E. coli in standing water in one family’s living room — levels 135 times those considered safe — as well as elevated levels of lead, arsenic and other heavy metals in sediment from the floodwaters in the kitchen.- The New York Times

There’s pretty clearly sewage contamination, and it’s more concentrated inside the home than outside the home,” said Lauren Stadler, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at Rice University who participated in The Times‘s research. “It suggests to me that conditions inside the home are more ideal for bacteria to grow and concentrate. It’s warmer and the water has stagnated for days and days. I know some kids were playing in the floodwater outside those places. That’s concerning to me.”

Residents and medical professionals are becoming increasingly concerned as well. Many have Click to see the original article