STRANGEST Places in Australia

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Australia is a vast and mysterious continent, filled with hidden geological gems and even opals. Mining has shaped the land of the outback and towns have gone abandoned after extracting the nearby resources. There is plenty of things to see here, whether it’s a rock wave or a town that’s been possibly visited by aliens. Here are the strangest places in australia.

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6.Coober Pedy
This isolated community is found in the Australian outback in the southern part of the continents and consists of 1762 people, many of whom are of aboriginal descent. The town is renowned for its opal production, giving it the nickname the opal capital of the world. Over 70 percent of the world’s opals come from the surrounding areas, making it quite unique. Many of the inhabitants turn for shelter underground due to the hot temperatures during summer. Guests who make it out here somehow have the option to live like the locals, underground motel rooms like we see here. Coober Pedy is extremely isolated and getting here is no easy task. It’s positioned 846 km north of Adelaide and 645 kilometers south of Alice Springs. Visitors can also check out the Umoona Opal mine to get a taste of the culture here.

5.Pink Lake Australia
Despite it being fairly well-known this bright pink lake has to be the strangest lake in the world hands down, even if there’s isn’t aliens hiding out here. Located in Western Australia, it’s also known as Lake Hillier, and every day of the year, it’s a solid bubblegum pink color. The lake is about 1900 feet wide and completely surrounded by eucalyptus trees and a small sand dune. No one understands completely how it manages to stay pink but some scientists believe that its a unique dye created from bacteria that feed off salt. In case you were wondering, it is safe to swim here. The guy that first took a dip must have been pretty brave! The best way to view this lake is from the sky.

4. Shell Beach
You’ll have absolutely no problem finding seashells at this place. On the more remote side of Australia, you’ll come across the unique shell beach located in the Shark Bay World Heritage Area. This place is made of trillions of tiny Hamelin cockle Shells. The little mollusks are no longer living in the shells but they’ve left them there for you to enjoy this cool beach?! It’s actually only one of two beaches entirely made of shells. Due to the high salinity or salt levels at this beach, the cockle has virtually no predators and were able flourish in this area. If you managed to dig beneath about 30 feet of shells, you’d run into what’s known as Coquina which is a type of limestone formed from them.

3.Lake Mckenzie
Located on Fraser Island on the eastern coast of Australia, this lake is so pure that animals can’t even survive in it. How is that possible? Now that’s one pure lake! The acid levels are a little bit high but it’s said to be made purely of rainwater. It almost makes you wonder if rain water is still a fresh source of water with all the air pollution on. But in any case, the pure silica beaches are certainly inviting. One of the most visited natural bodies of water in australia and the only other things in this lake are basically sunscreen, white sand and swimmers. Also in case you didn’t notice, this lake would be perfect to go to on your honeymoon because.. It’s shaped like a heart.

2.Wandjina Rock Art
The spooky rock art found in Western Australia was created by aboriginal tribes, who would have had no western influence of our depiction of aliens. Despite this, you’ll still find the petroglyphs of what seems to be very similar to how we would describe an alien. With a large heads, big-eyes and an odd body shape, these paintings were extremely important to them. They were given several coats of painting. The aboriginals claimed these were the weather spirits, who have the capability to create rainfall.

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